Have a project that needs editing? Don’t panic. Read this first..

A big thanks to author and editor, Steve Soderquist for his time in sharing several invaluable tips for writers of every kind.  Read his answers to the five questions I posed to him and then check out his book to help you with even more invaluable advice for your own manuscripts.

Steve Soderquist Author picture

  1. For most authors, the word ‘editing’ elicits a fight or flight pattern, most preferring to flee. Why did you bravely decide to tackle this field?

I believe everyone–not just writers–carry the burden of uncertainty when it comes to the English language. Writers tend to feel this more intensely as the pressure is high to produce written work that hopefully, folks will like. It’s important to note a well-written manuscript isn’t the same as a well-told story. The difference is, when the work is ‘clean’ and is as free of grammatical and punctuation errors as possible, it allows the reader and/or acquisition editor to see the story that much clearer. Average stories still sell, and at times very well, however, badly written stories are much rarer.

The reason I got into editing was my love of the language. I found I had an almost idiot savants understanding for the rules that govern English and for me, the hardest part was understanding why I understood what I did. I say ‘almost,’ as no one is born with the ability to know what a dangling participle means or why two of them shouldn’t be back-to-back, but when I look at it, (and many other rules) they seem to jump out at me, and my fingers do the rest when correcting. This didn’t come to me when I attended school, but much later in life. In my high school years, I got below-average marks in English, but loved to read. As a fact, the first few times I even attempted to write short stories were a complete mess. The actual ‘when’ it all came together is a bit fuzzy, but I remember having an urge to learn what made English tick, and soon found myself devouring every rule and grammar book from William Strunk and E.B. White’s ‘The Elements of Style’ to Stephen King’s ‘On Writing.’ I was fascinated with the way words, in certain positions in a sentence, could change the very tone and inflection of the meaning of that sentence, and thus, the story itself. Most writers tackle manuscripts in a linear time-frame, and I spent a large part of my learning time studying the nuances of reflection in the prose and tense as the feature. I began to understand that while we live in a linear world, our minds are forever moving either backward in reflection or forward in expectation. This enables me to help a writer greatly in rounding out their characters in situations when things get perhaps wooden, or boring, or lost, or a combination of those and many others. The bottom line is, I edit because every manuscript to me is a puzzle, and helping a writer achieve the best of their story is extremely pleasurable.

2. What is the hardest part about editing a manuscript?

I would have to say the tedious act of correcting easy-to-know punctuation rules. Every writer should have a strong grasp of basic English 101, and if not, take the time to study and learn. As I mentioned, proper English isn’t something anyone is born with, it’s a skill that needs to be honed. The basic elements need to be in place if a writer ever hopes to be published by a traditional publishing company, and if independently publishing, I always hope the author did their due diligence before uploading their files. I won’t go into all, or even a few of the basics, but do note that when they aren’t there, they stick out like a sore thumb to the reader. One doesn’t have to hold a degree in English to know when something is off. We spent our whole lives reading as we grow up, and most of what we’ve read has been properly proofed and edited, especially if it was for sale. We get used to reading correctly, so when it isn’t, even though a reader may not know that comma should be there in that compound sentence, you can bet a paycheck it will still read wrong to him or her.

3. Most publishers require authors to ‘tighten up their manuscript’ by doing their own self-editing.  With this in mind, what would you recommend a new author do first?

Read it out loud. Nothing will help a writer catch their own mistakes in a more clear and definitive way than simply doing this. Check for inconsistencies in time-lines, plot-holes, names, dates; avoid the deus ex machina whenever possible, and research, research, research! We live in a world that has Google now, so there is never a reason for the alerion of an airplane to ever be called, ‘that flappy-thingy.’
I’ve told many writers and still do, “Edit until you just about hate the thing.” Also, ironically, don’t fully trust an editor to catch every mistake. I mean that, too. We’re human, just like you, and we make mistakes. The difference is, that’s your name on the cover…not the editor. So when you get that final copy back to read over, actually read it, don’t just blow through it. Once it’s in print or ebook, whether you pull it back to make corrections or not, (which looks very unprofessional) those initial copies are still out there. Be diligent, patient and get the job done right the first time.

4. What is one ‘rule of thumb’ to always remember when editing?

Never assume you’re right if you feel that little tickle in the back of your mind that something is off. Double-check it for accuracy and correctness.

5. What is the most common editing blunder you’ve found when editing an author’s work?

That’s a good question but hard to pin down, as every writer has their own unique style and flow of writing. Each manuscript I’ve worked on is as individual as the writer themselves. No two have ever been alike. All that being said, the most common error I run into is punctuation, such as putting a period at the end of a terminal sentence in dialog that proceeds an incomplete past participle, as in:
“We have to leave now.” Jane said.

I won’t go into a lesson, but if you read that sentence and don’t see a problem, please go over the basics of English.

Thanks for the opportunity to share! My email is always open, and I hope to see all of you out there in print. Stay upbeat and focused!

Peace

Where to find me:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/steve.soderquist.3
Facebook Author Page: https://www.facebook.com/SteveSoderquistAuthor/
Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/author/stevesoderquist
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6626657.Steve_Soderquist
Google+: https://plus.google.com/116546158818053309346
Twitter: https://twitter.com/skirascal – @skirascal
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stevesoderquist/
Email: https://steves@foundationsbooks.net
Website: http://www.SteveSoderquist.com/
YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCV55b1YWTrqw5ihuBMBfcnw
Foundations: https://www.FoundationsBooks.net
For my book, ‘Practical Tips for Every Author,’ please visit:

Steve Soderquist_Book Cover

 

 

A day in the life of an Author

First of all, let me start off with…  Aaargh!!!!!   What a day this has been.  But if you think an Author’s life is all roses and pink-colored glasses, guess what, it’s not that way at all.

Life for an author is a struggle.  I imagine this continues until you make it big.  For those very few who do, I commend you for getting past the struggle and finding your own way through it- a secret that the rest of us are still scratching our heads and trying to figure out for ourselves.

As one of the majority of struggling authors, I have found that authors are just people, having the same personalities, nuances and quirks as everyone else.  The only difference is they write, hoping to make a living out of it.  Being an author doesn’t gift you with a magic wand or special powers (wouldn’t that be great, though?) to make your endeavor easier.  There’s no one to hand you a simple step-by-step “How to be famous” handbook.  Finding authors that can advise you, coach you and/ or even help advertise on their FB wall to get the word out about your book is extremely hard to find but when you find one, latch on to them for they are worth gold in this sometimes secretive, harboring precious details “special society” you have now become a part of.

It’s a struggle and unless you’re a celebrity or have connections, the sales will be slow to nil but don’t stop.  Keep plugging along, at least that’s the wise advice I got today from my good friend, Michael, when I was ready to ball my eyes out for all the frustrations I’ve endured, lately.  I know now why authors self-publish.  As much as I like traditional publishers and crave the status and camaraderie of an agent to help me with my work, having one book published a year doesn’t keep up a momentum to increase one’s fan base or does much for one’s self esteem.

As the year draws to a close, think about your goals and focus on one big one that can start the flow going for the others.  For instance, I want to sell books but in order to sell, I also have to write.  I have marketed, participated in Author Takeovers, spotlights, interviews, book tours, contests and giveaways until I can turn rainbow colors but if I don’t have any books to talk about, I can’t promote, market or advertise and my readers will have nothing to look forward to.  So, the key is write, write, write and don’t forget it.

The more books you get out there, the more you can talk about, the more you can generate a fan base, and the more known you will be (we hope).  This is what I’ve learned from today’s frustration.  That and the confirmation that every author needs a strong, dependable friend or a support group.  Mine today was Michael, quoting to me words from the song “Gone, gone, gone” by Phillip Phillips, “Like a drum baby, don’t stop beating.”  Don’t let my passion die.  Don’t stop writing.  That’s pretty much Michael’s words to me, in a gist.  And for you, my dear colleagues and friends, don’t you stop either.

Here’s to a better, more profitable New Year for all of us!  Cheers.

It’s been one year and I still love writing

October 24, 2015 marked one year since my first book, Nightfall, was published.  I was lucky enough to win the faith of a traditional publisher, Luminosity Publishing, who took a chance on me.  Thank you!

Since publishing my first book, I have published one more, the first in a 5-book series:  Jasper, The Guardian League, Book One and I am awaiting publication of my third book:  Centurion:  The Guardian League, Book Two.  And, I am writing my fourth book:  Apollo, The Guardian League, Book Three.

It’s slow going for me, compared to other authors who seem to whip 5 or more books out a year, but for me, working a full-time job and writing on the side as much as my energy and body are willing to do, I have to say I’m doing pretty well and the good part, the most important part is I still love writing.  I won’t say there aren’t hard times.  As a new author, you encounter barriers and challenges everywhere, ending in days where you’ll question why you keep hitting your head on a wall (because that’s what it feels like in the struggle to market yourself).  It matters that your book is good but what seems to matter even more is getting the word out about fantastic you and sales of your book.

In the past year I have learned how and where to advertise, how to search for reviewers, contacting countless of them for reviews of my books, hosted three contests for free books, and have experienced a virtual book tour.  I have also connected with several fans (I love speaking to fans and interacting with them) and some amazing fellow authors.  I am trying, I am learning and I am still in the running- yes!

What matters is to:  keep writing, keep interacting, and keep marketing yourself wherever and whenever.  Whatever you do and no matter how few fans you have, keep the faith and write, write, write because the fans will come.  That was what one writer told me and she was correct.  The more you write, the more you have to market and the more readers you will gain.  And if all else fails, self-publish.  I have a short story book that I will most likely have to take this route as not many publishers want to publish short story books.

Whatever you do, don’t stop!  If writing is your dream, keep doing it.  Live your dream.  Do what makes you happy and have faith in yourself that you can achieve all you want to be.  In fact, take a break right now, sit down in your comfortable recliner and relax and visualize the amazing success you want with your books.  This is good advice for me too for life gets crazy and complicated and we forget to take care of ourselves but do it because you are worth it.  Just a few minutes is all you need to re-energize and re-motivate.

So, a year has gone by but I’m still going, still loving it and still writing.  You should be too!

Take care, friends and be safe.